Bruising easily: What causes this to happen
If you bruise easily, you may have questions about what’s causing the problem and what you can do about it. Find out what role aging plays and when to see a doctor.

Another ugly bruise. You don’t remember hitting anything, but lately you seem to be bruising a lot. Is that cause for concern?

Easy bruising is common with age. Although most bruises are harmless and heal without treatment, easy bruising may be a sign of a more serious problem.

Why is the elderly frequently bruised easily?
Most bruises form when small blood vessels (capillaries) near the surface of the skin break from the impact of a blow or injury, often to the arms or legs. When this happens, blood leaks from the vessels and appears in the extremities as a black and blue mark. Eventually, the body absorbs the blood again and this mark disappears.

Generally speaking, stronger blows cause larger bruising. But if you bruise easily, a slight bump — you might not even notice it — can lead to an effective bruise.

Some – especially women – are more likely than others to bruise. As you get older, your skin becomes thinner and loses part of the protective fatty layer that helps keep blood vessels from getting injured.

Can medications and supplements contribute to easy bruising?
Aspirin, anticoagulant drugs, and antiplatelet agents reduce the blood’s ability to clot. Antibiotics may also be associated with clotting problems. As a result, bleeding from capillary damage may take longer than usual to stop — allowing enough blood to leak to cause a larger bruise.

body ache feels like bruises

body ache feels like bruises

Topical and systemic corticosteroids — which can be used to treat various conditions, including allergies, asthma and eczema — damage the skin, making it easier to bruise. Some nutritional supplements, such as ginkgo, can also increase the risk of bruising due to its blood-thinning effect.

If you experience an increase in bruising, don’t stop taking your medications. Talk to your doctor about your concerns. Also, make sure your doctor knows about all the nutritional supplements you’re taking — especially if you’re taking them while taking blood thinners. Your doctor may recommend that you avoid certain over-the-counter medications or supplements.

When is bruising easily a sign of a serious problem?
Sometimes easy bruising indicates a serious underlying condition, such as a problem with blood clotting or a blood disease. You should visit a doctor in the following cases:

Frequent major bruising, especially if the bruise appears on your trunk, back, or face, or if it appears without known causes
Easy bruising and previous heavy bleeding, such as bleeding that occurs during surgical procedures
A bruise appears suddenly, especially if you recently started a new medication
Having a family history of easy bruising or bleeding
These signs and symptoms may include:

Low levels of blood components that help it to clot after an injury (thrombocytopenia)
Abnormal platelet function
Problems with proteins that help blood clot
To find the cause of the bruise, your doctor may check your blood platelet levels or run tests to measure the time it takes your blood to clot.

Another serious cause of bruising is domestic violence or abuse. If someone close to you develops a bruise without justifiable reason, especially in an unusual place such as the face, be aware of the possibility of an attack.

How can I avoid or treat bruising?
To avoid minor bruising, follow these steps to avoid falling:

Use good lighting in your home.
Avoid clutter and rugs, especially on stairs.
Arrange furniture and electrical cords so they don’t get in the way when you’re walking.
Learn about all the side effects of the medicines you take. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you feel dizzy or drowsy while taking a certain medicine.
Check your vision and hearing. Even small changes in vision or hearing can cause you to fall.
Unfortunately, once a bruise occurs, there are not many ways to treat it. Most bruises eventually disappear because the body reabsorbs the blood, although recovery may take longer as you get older. It may be helpful to elevate the affected area and apply ice to it.


Bruising or bleeding after an injury is normal. But some people have disorders that cause them to bruise or bleed very easily. Sometimes people bleed without an apparent accident or injury. Spontaneous bleeding can occur in almost any part of the body, but it is most common in the nose, mouth, and gastrointestinal tract. People with hemophilia ( ) often bleed into joints or muscles. Most often, the bleeding is mild, but it may be severe enough to be life-threatening. However, even minor bleeding is dangerous if it occurs in the brain.

Several symptoms can indicate that a person has a bleeding disorder:

Nosebleeds (nosebleeds) unexplained
Excessive or prolonged menstrual blood flow (menorrhagia)
Prolonged bleeding after minor cuts, blood draws, minor surgical or dental procedures, or tooth brushing or flossing
Unexplained streaks or skin tags, including red or purple spots (petechiae), pink patches (purpura), ecchymoses, or small, dilated blood vessels seen in the skin or mucous membranes (telangiectasias)
Sometimes, a test done for some other cause shows that the person has a predisposition to bleed.

Blood disorders / blood clotting / bruising (bruising) and bleeding

Bruising or bleeding after an injury is normal. But some people have disorders that cause them to bruise or bleed very easily. Sometimes people bleed without an apparent accident or injury. Spontaneous bleeding can occur in almost any part of the body, but it is most common in the nose, mouth, and gastrointestinal tract. People with hemophilia often bleed into the joints or muscles. Most often, the bleeding is mild, but it may be severe enough to be life-threatening. However, even minor bleeding is dangerous if it occurs in the brain.

Several symptoms can indicate that a person has a bleeding disorder:

Nosebleeds (nosebleeds) unexplained
Excessive or prolonged menstrual blood flow (menorrhagia)
Prolonged bleeding after minor cuts, blood draws, minor surgical or dental procedures, or tooth brushing or flossing
Unexplained streaks or skin tags, including red or purple spots (petechiae), pink patches (purpura), ecchymoses, or small, dilated blood vessels seen in the skin or mucous membranes (telangiectasias)
Sometimes, a test done for some other cause shows that the person has a predisposition to bleed.

the reasons
Three things are needed to help stop bleeding from small blood vessels: platelets (small cell-like blood particles that help blood clot), blood clotting factors (proteins produced in large quantities by the liver that are needed for blood to clot), and narrowing of a blood vessel (vasoconstriction). ). Any disturbance or imbalance in these factors can lead to excessive bleeding or bruising

Thrombocytopenia disorders, including too few (thrombocytopenia), too much or too little thrombocytopenia
Underactivity of blood clotting factors (as in hemophilia, liver disorders, vitamin K deficiency, or use of certain drugs)
vascular defects
The platelets first cause small red or pink spots on the skin. Then, when the disorder becomes severe, bleeding may occur. A deficiency of clotting factors usually leads to bleeding and bruising. Defects in the blood vessels cause red or pink spots and petechiae on the skin, rather than bleeding.

Common causes
The most common causes of easy bleeding include:

Severe thrombocytopenia
Use of drugs that suppress clotting (anticoagulants), such as warfarin or heparin
Liver disease (leading to decreased production of clotting factors)
Thrombocytopenia can result from insufficient production of platelets by the bone marrow or from their over-destruction (due to an enlarged spleen, certain medications, or infections). Some people who have a tendency to form blood clots may use drugs such as heparin or warfarin to reduce this predisposition. However, these drugs sometimes lead to a severe decrease in the body’s ability to clot, resulting in bleeding or bruising. Since the liver helps regulate blood clotting, people with liver disease (such as hepatitis or cirrhosis) are also more likely to bleed easily.

It is more common that easy bruising or excessive bruising occurs due to the fragility of the skin and blood vessels, especially in women and the elderly of both sexes. Bruises tend to appear on the thighs, buttocks (buttocks), and upper extremities. However, these people do not have other symptoms of excessive bleeding, and blood test results are normal. This condition is not dangerous and does not need treatment.

Less common causes
Hemophilia A and hemophilia B ( ) are genetic disorders in which the body does not produce enough of one of the clotting factors. Usually after minor bruising, excessive bleeding into deep tissues, such as the muscles, joints, and the back part of the abdominal cavity, occurs in people with the disease. Bleeding can occur in the brain, and in this case it can be fatal.

In uncommon cases, some disorders trigger the clotting system throughout the body. Instead of dispersed blood clots, platelets and clotting factors are rapidly used up and bleeding occurs. This disorder, called disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) (see disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), can result from a number of conditions, including severe infections, extensive trauma, labor and delivery, and some cancers. People with disseminated intravascular coagulation are usually in the hospital when this problem occurs. They bleed heavily from needlestick sites, and often have visible bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract.

Blood disorders / blood clotting / bruising (bruising) and bleeding

Bruising or bleeding after an injury is normal. But some people have disorders that cause them to bruise or bleed very easily. Sometimes people bleed without an apparent accident or injury. Spontaneous bleeding can occur in almost any part of the body, but it is most common in the nose, mouth, and gastrointestinal tract. People with hemophilia often bleed into the joints or muscles. Most often, the bleeding is mild, but it may be severe enough to be life-threatening. However, even minor bleeding is dangerous if it occurs in the brain.

Several symptoms can indicate that a person has a bleeding disorder:

Nosebleeds (nosebleeds) unexplained
Excessive or prolonged menstrual blood flow (menorrhagia)
Prolonged bleeding after minor cuts, blood draws, minor surgical or dental procedures, or tooth brushing or flossing
Unexplained streaks or skin tags, including red or purple spots (petechiae), pink patches (purpura), ecchymoses, or small, dilated blood vessels seen in the skin or mucous membranes (telangiectasias)
Sometimes, a test done for some other cause shows that the person has a predisposition to bleed.

the reasons
Three things are needed to help stop bleeding from small blood vessels: platelets (small cell-like blood particles that help blood clot), blood clotting factors (proteins produced in large quantities by the liver that are needed for blood to clot), and narrowing of a blood vessel (vasoconstriction). ). Any disturbance or imbalance in these factors can lead to excessive bleeding or bruising

Thrombocytopenia disorders, including too few (thrombocytopenia), too much or too little thrombocytopenia
Underactivity of blood clotting factors (as in hemophilia, liver disorders, vitamin K deficiency, or use of certain drugs)
vascular defects
The platelets first cause small red or pink spots on the skin. Then, when the disorder becomes severe, bleeding may occur. A deficiency of clotting factors usually leads to bleeding and bruising. Defects in the blood vessels cause red or pink spots and petechiae on the skin, rather than bleeding.

Common causes
The most common causes of easy bleeding include:

Severe thrombocytopenia
Use of drugs that suppress clotting (anticoagulants), such as warfarin or heparin
Liver disease (leading to decreased production of clotting factors)
Thrombocytopenia can result from insufficient production of platelets by the bone marrow or from their over-destruction (due to an enlarged spleen, certain medications, or infections). Some people who have a tendency to form blood clots may use drugs such as heparin or warfarin to reduce this predisposition. However, these drugs sometimes lead to a severe decrease in the body’s ability to clot, resulting in bleeding or bruising. Since the liver helps regulate blood clotting, people with liver disease (such as hepatitis or cirrhosis) are also more likely to bleed easily.

It is more common that easy bruising or excessive bruising occurs due to the fragility of the skin and blood vessels, especially in women and the elderly of both sexes. Bruises tend to appear on the thighs, buttocks (buttocks), and upper extremities. However, these people do not have other symptoms of excessive bleeding, and blood test results are normal. This condition is not dangerous and does not need treatment.

Less common causes
Hemophilia A and hemophilia B ( ) are genetic disorders in which the body does not produce enough of one of the clotting factors. Usually after minor bruising, excessive bleeding into deep tissues, such as the muscles, joints, and the back part of the abdominal cavity, occurs in people with the disease. Bleeding can occur in the brain, and in this case it can be fatal.

In uncommon cases, some disorders trigger the clotting system throughout the body. Instead of dispersed blood clots, platelets and clotting factors are rapidly used up and bleeding occurs. This disorder, called disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) (see disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), can result from a number of conditions, including severe infections, extensive trauma, labor and delivery, and some cancers. People with disseminated intravascular coagulation are usually in the hospital when this problem occurs. They bleed heavily from needlestick sites, and often have visible bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract.