Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery

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Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery

Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery
Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery

today we are going to talk to you about rotator cuff tears and healing as well as Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery

the stiffness that occurs after rotator cuff surgery, many of patients are going to suffer from such stiffness for a while after the surgery.

most post-operative from patients of rotator cuff about 2 of every 12 patient will suffer from Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery. that’s becuase the blood supply in that tendon is really poor.

in facr, most the reasons that cause us to tear rotator cuff is thet it degenerate over time and the blood supply wasn’t enough to heal it, so the damage accumulated causing it to tore.

and when we try to heal that it doesn’t always heal

 

So Is It Just  A Case Of Post-Operative Stiffness Or Is It Frozen Shoulder Stiffness

Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery
Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery is a prevailing condition that causes pain and stiffness in the shoulder as a result of whether tightening or thickening of the capsule that protects the shoulder structure.

Patients with frozen shoulder often experience aches, stiffn joint and some degree of limited range of motion which may worsens over the time.

Frozen Shouulder Diagnosis

  • A thorough doctor’s exam and evaluation of the patient’s condition
  • X-ray
  • MRI Test
  • Arthrograms

What Does It Mean To Have A Frozen Shoulder

A frozen shoulder typically means that the doctor or the physical therapist cannot move your arm for you.

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If the arm can be raised with the help of the doctor or  therapist, then it’s less likely to be a frozen shoulder.

Ask your Physio to contact your surgeon’s office (secretary) in order to explain their findings about your case. It will be a lot more easier if your Physio knows your surgeon.

 

Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery Actually Protects The Patient From Damaging Their Joint

Post operative Frozen Shoulder is not rare

in most cases, if a patient came to the doctor’s office after the rotator cuff surgery without having stiffness in their cuff, they almost fail to their repair operation

the patient will most likely to be happy if they get their full range of motion post operation, but this is not always right or good for you , as if you try to push the joint beyond your threshold, you might tore through the repair actually.

the most ipmortant thing after rotator cuff surgery is giving this tissue time to heal

if the patient at the end of the day have full motion, but their rotator cuff not completely healed or still painful, that is difinetely a bigger problem than if the rotator cuff healed but they are stiff, then this is just a simple problem to deal with.

so now you know that Stiffness, Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery are actually good for you and they are an indication that you are on your way to comlete healing.

rotator cuff recovery is difficult, and it’s really important that your surgon keeps you well educated and well informed about the situation and to be frank that it’s a long trip toward healing

 

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How To Deal With Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery

 

Frozen Shoulder OR Adhesive Capsulitis After Rotator Cuff Surgery may not resolve spontaneously. Because the stiffness in these cases results from actual scar tissue forming between tissue layers rather than an inflammatory contracture of the shoulder capsule, these types of frozen shoulder may require more aggressive treatment.

Treatment for frozen shoulder will mainly focus on managing and relieving the pain. TIn order to do that, your doctor may advice:

Minimally invasive surgical procedures, such as distension, arthroscopy, and manipulation, may be the last resort if all the above failed to relieve your pain for stretching or releasing the contracted joint capsule.

 

How is Frozen Shoulder Treated?

  • Activity Modification: most patients suffering from frozen shoulder will be encouraged to remain active. However, trying to force yourself to work through the pain is not recommended.
  • Physical Therapy: Your treatment plan may include implementing a specially designed Frozen Shoulder Physical Therapy Protocol to perform strengthening and stretching exercises to improve your range of motion.
  • Home Exercise Program: gentle stretching exercises should be performed 2- 3 times daily to prevent adhesions from reforming between therapy sessions.

  • Non-steroid Anti-inflammatory Medications (NSAIDs): .However, the  Long-term use of NSAIDs may be associated with many health risks such as irritation of the stomach lining, ulcers, and kidney problems.
  • Cortisone Injections
  • Nerve Blocks
  • Acupuncture
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